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2022-06-21, M5.9, Afghanistan

On June 21, 2022 at 20:54:36 UTC a magnitude 5.9 earthquake occurred approximately 150km south of Kabul near the border with Pakistan (see map below). EMSC reports the earthquake originated at a depth of 10 kilometers. The earthquake caused widesoread damage with at least 300 fatalities and hundreds of injured. The event was felt widely to distances of 500km from the epicentre, including parts of Pakistan and India. Strong earthquakes in eastern Afghanistan result from the India plate moving northward and colliding with the Eurasia plate causing uplift producing high mountain ranges, including the Hindu Kush and the Himalaya.

The event was recorded by seismic stations worldwide, including stations in the Irish National Seismic Network (INSN), see figure below.

For more information please see the links below:

https://www.emsc-csem.org/Earthquake/earthquake.php?id=1141004

https://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/eventpage/us7000hj3u

2022-04-17, M2.5, North Atlantic

On the 17th of April 2022 at 18:48 UTC a magnitude M2.5 earthquake occurred in the North Atlantic, approximately 90km NW of Donegal, locating south of the Rockall Trough. The earthquake located with a depth of 10 km. In the map below the epicentre of the earthquake is indicated with a red marker. Major fault zones in and around Ireland are shown with black lines. The most recent detected earthquake at this location was M0.7, occurring on the 6th of March 2022. Further to the north in the Rockall Trough, earthquakes with magnitudes up to M4.0 have been detected regularly since 1980.

The event was recorded by the Irish National Seismic Network (INSN) and can be seen in the waveforms plotted below:

2022-03-21, M5.2, North Sea

On the 21st of March 2022 at 06:32 UTC a magnitude M5.2 earthquake occurred in the North Sea, approximately 205 km WNW of Bergen, Norway. The earthquake located with a depth of 10 km and was reported felt from the western parts of southern Norway. The earthquake location is indicated by the red circle in the map below. The North Sea has low to intermediate seismicity with the majority of it occurring along the Norwegian coastline. Events are generally below M3 however a similar magnitude event was recorded in the same region on the 24th January 1927.

The event was recorded by seismic stations worldwide, including stations in the Irish National Seismic Network (INSN) (see figure below). The first seismic waves originating from the North Sea earthquake arrived in Ireland ~2 minutes after the event origin.

For more information on the North Sea earthquake please see these links:

https://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/eventpage/us6000h6bi/executive

https://www.emsc-csem.org/Earthquake/earthquake.php?id=1109087

https://nnsn.geo.uib.no/nnsn/#/news

2022-03-16, M7.3, Japan

At 14:36:33 (UTC) on the 16th of March 2022 a magnitude 7.3 earthquake occurred near the east coast of Honshu Japan, 57 km east-north-east of Namie which is located in Fukushima Prefecture (see map below). The NWS Pacific Tsunami Warning Center initially issued a warning for hazardous waves along the coast of Japan but now reports the threat from this event has passed. The Tokyo Electric Power Company reports over 2 million households in nine prefectures have been left without electricity due to the earthquake.

Japans tectonic setting is complex as it is influenced by the North America plate, Pacific plate, Philippine Sea plate, and Eurasian plate. A detailed summary of the region is available from the USGS at the following link https://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/eventpage/us6000h519/region-info.

The event was recorded by seismic stations worldwide, including stations in the Irish National Seismic Network (INSN) (see figure below). The first seismic waves originating from the Japan earthquake arrived in Ireland ~15 minutes after the event origin.

For more information on the M7.3 Japan earthquake please see these links:

https://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/eventpage/us6000h519/executive?utm_medium=email&utm_source=ENS&utm_campaign=realtime

https://www.jma.go.jp/bosai/map.html#5/38.393/143.174/&elem=warn&contents=tsunami&lang=en

http://geofon.gfz-potsdam.de/eqinfo/event.php?id=gfz2022fgid

https://www.emsc-csem.org/Earthquake/earthquake.php?id=1107417

2022-03-10, M3.4, North Atlantic

On the 10th of March 2022 at 10:57 UTC a magnitude M3.4 earthquake occurred in the Porcupine Abyssal Plain in the North Atlantic. The earthquake located with a depth of 15 km and is indicated by the red circle in the map below. While earthquakes are known to occur in this region, it is not often that they are detected. As almost all seismometers are land-based, only larger magnitude events (M > 2) are seen from this region. The previous two earthquakes from this area were detected in 2020 and 2015 (M2.5 and M2.4), and the largest earthquake detected (since 1980) in the Porcupine region was M4.4, occurring on the 17th of February 1980.

The event was recorded by the Irish National Seismic Network (INSN) and can be seen in the waveforms plotted below:

2021-11-16, M3.3, Scotland

On the 16th of November 2021 at 01:44 UTC a magnitude 3.3 earthquake occurred in Western Scotland. The earthquake located with a depth of approximately 6 km and is indicated by the red circle in the map below. There have been reports of the event being felt in Scotland and Northern Ireland.

The event was recorded by the stations of the Irish National Seismic Network (INSN) and can be seen in the waveforms plotted below:

Listen to Dr Martin Möllhoff discussing this event on RTE Radio 1’s Morning Ireland show here:

https://www.rte.ie/radio/radio1/clips/22030318/

More information is available from:


https://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/eventpage/us7000fugg/executive

https://www.emsc.eu/Earthquake/earthquake.php?id=1062853

http://www.earthquakes.bgs.ac.uk/earthquakes/recent_events/20211116014340.html#page=summary

2021-07-29, M8.2, Alaska

On July 29, 2021 at 06:15 UTC (July 28, 2021 22:51 local time) a magnitude 8.2 earthquake occurred approximately 80km south of the Alaska Penninsula (see map below). The USGS report the earthquake originated at a depth of 32 kilometers. Large earthquakes are common in this region as a result of thrust faulting at shallow depth on the subduction zone interface between the Pacific plate and the North America plate.

The event was recorded by seismic stations worldwide, including stations in the Irish National Seismic Network (INSN) (see figure below). The first seismic waves originating from the Alaska earthquake arrived ~6 minutes after the event origin.

For more information please see the links below:

https://www.usgs.gov/news/magnitude-82-earthquake-alaska

https://www.emsc-csem.org/Earthquake/earthquake.php?id=1014588

2021-02-10, M7.7, Loyalty Islands

At 13:20:00 (UTC) on the 10th February 2021, a magnitude 7.7 earthquake occurred southeast of the Loyalty Islands in the Pacific, see map below. The epicenter lies in a very remote region and only few people felt the event. The earthquake struck at a depth of 10 km and according to the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center a tsunami was triggered. Reported wave heights are 78cm in Vanuatu, 47cm at Norfolk Island, 29cm in New Caledonia and 22cm at the North Cape in New Zealand. At time of writing no fatalities or building damage were reported. The Loyalty Islands region is seismically very active, 15 other earthquakes with magnitudes larger than 7 were detected over the preceding century. This seismic activity is related to the plate boundary between the Australian and the Pacific plate.

The earthquake was recorded at seismic stations worldwide, including stations of the Irish Nation Seismic Network (INSN), see seismic waveforms below.

Further information is available from the following sources:

https://www.emsc-csem.org/Earthquake/earthquake.php?id=947612

https://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/eventpage/us6000dg77

2020-09-17, M1.3, Offshore Skerries, North Dublin

On the 17th of September 2020 at 17:31:40 GMT, a magnitude M1.3 earthquake occurred in the Irish Sea approximately 2 km offshore Skerries, North Dublin. The earthquake occurred at a depth of 14 km. The epicentre location is indicated with a red circle in the map below, black lines denote major fault zones in and around Ireland. Earthquakes do occur regularly in the Irish Sea, however, it is not often that earthquakes are detected so close to Ireland’s east coast. The last detected earthquake to occur within 10 km of the east coast was the M2.4 event from the 18th of March 2013, occurring 6 km offshore Wexford.

The event was recorded by the Irish National Seismic Network (INSN) and can be seen in the waveforms plotted below:

2020-07-22, M7.8, Alaska Peninsula

At 06:12:44 (UTC) on the 22nd of July 2020, a magnitude 7.8 earthquake occurred  near the Alaska Peninsula (see map below). The earthquake struck approximately 100 km south of the peninsula at a depth of 30 km. Shortly after, a tsunami warning was issued by the U.S. Tsunami Warning System. Several aftershocks of magnitude 5 and greater occurred within the hours following the main shock. Large earthquakes are common in this region due to the subduction of the Pacific plate beneath the North American plate. Since 1900, twelve earthquakes with magnitudes greater than 7.5 have occurred in this region, including the 1964 M9.2 Prince William Sound earthquake, the second largest recorded earthquake in the era of modern instrumental seismology.

The earthquake was recorded at seismic stations worldwide, including stations of the Irish Nation Seismic Network (INSN), see seismic waveforms below (select figure to enlarge).

Further information is available from the following sources:

https://www.emsc-csem.org/Earthquake/earthquake.php?id=878808

https://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/eventpage/us7000asvb/executive

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