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2022-04-17, M2.5, North Atlantic

On the 17th of April 2022 at 18:48 UTC a magnitude M2.5 earthquake occurred in the North Atlantic, approximately 90km NW of Donegal, locating south of the Rockall Trough. The earthquake located with a depth of 10 km. In the map below the epicentre of the earthquake is indicated with a red marker. Major fault zones in and around Ireland are shown with black lines. The most recent detected earthquake at this location was M0.7, occurring on the 6th of March 2022. Further to the north in the Rockall Trough, earthquakes with magnitudes up to M4.0 have been detected regularly since 1980.

The event was recorded by the Irish National Seismic Network (INSN) and can be seen in the waveforms plotted below:

2022-03-21, M5.2, North Sea

On the 21st of March 2022 at 06:32 UTC a magnitude M5.2 earthquake occurred in the North Sea, approximately 205 km WNW of Bergen, Norway. The earthquake located with a depth of 10 km and was reported felt from the western parts of southern Norway. The earthquake location is indicated by the red circle in the map below. The North Sea has low to intermediate seismicity with the majority of it occurring along the Norwegian coastline. Events are generally below M3 however a similar magnitude event was recorded in the same region on the 24th January 1927.

The event was recorded by seismic stations worldwide, including stations in the Irish National Seismic Network (INSN) (see figure below). The first seismic waves originating from the North Sea earthquake arrived in Ireland ~2 minutes after the event origin.

For more information on the North Sea earthquake please see these links:

https://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/eventpage/us6000h6bi/executive

https://www.emsc-csem.org/Earthquake/earthquake.php?id=1109087

https://nnsn.geo.uib.no/nnsn/#/news

2022-03-16, M7.3, Japan

At 14:36:33 (UTC) on the 16th of March 2022 a magnitude 7.3 earthquake occurred near the east coast of Honshu Japan, 57 km east-north-east of Namie which is located in Fukushima Prefecture (see map below). The NWS Pacific Tsunami Warning Center initially issued a warning for hazardous waves along the coast of Japan but now reports the threat from this event has passed. The Tokyo Electric Power Company reports over 2 million households in nine prefectures have been left without electricity due to the earthquake.

Japans tectonic setting is complex as it is influenced by the North America plate, Pacific plate, Philippine Sea plate, and Eurasian plate. A detailed summary of the region is available from the USGS at the following link https://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/eventpage/us6000h519/region-info.

The event was recorded by seismic stations worldwide, including stations in the Irish National Seismic Network (INSN) (see figure below). The first seismic waves originating from the Japan earthquake arrived in Ireland ~15 minutes after the event origin.

For more information on the M7.3 Japan earthquake please see these links:

https://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/eventpage/us6000h519/executive?utm_medium=email&utm_source=ENS&utm_campaign=realtime

https://www.jma.go.jp/bosai/map.html#5/38.393/143.174/&elem=warn&contents=tsunami&lang=en

http://geofon.gfz-potsdam.de/eqinfo/event.php?id=gfz2022fgid

https://www.emsc-csem.org/Earthquake/earthquake.php?id=1107417

2022-03-10, M3.4, North Atlantic

On the 10th of March 2022 at 10:57 UTC a magnitude M3.4 earthquake occurred in the Porcupine Abyssal Plain in the North Atlantic. The earthquake located with a depth of 15 km and is indicated by the red circle in the map below. While earthquakes are known to occur in this region, it is not often that they are detected. As almost all seismometers are land-based, only larger magnitude events (M > 2) are seen from this region. The previous two earthquakes from this area were detected in 2020 and 2015 (M2.5 and M2.4), and the largest earthquake detected (since 1980) in the Porcupine region was M4.4, occurring on the 17th of February 1980.

The event was recorded by the Irish National Seismic Network (INSN) and can be seen in the waveforms plotted below:

2021-11-16, M3.3, Scotland

On the 16th of November 2021 at 01:44 UTC a magnitude 3.3 earthquake occurred in Western Scotland. The earthquake located with a depth of approximately 6 km and is indicated by the red circle in the map below. There have been reports of the event being felt in Scotland and Northern Ireland.

The event was recorded by the stations of the Irish National Seismic Network (INSN) and can be seen in the waveforms plotted below:

Listen to Dr Martin Möllhoff discussing this event on RTE Radio 1’s Morning Ireland show here:

https://www.rte.ie/radio/radio1/clips/22030318/

More information is available from:


https://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/eventpage/us7000fugg/executive

https://www.emsc.eu/Earthquake/earthquake.php?id=1062853

http://www.earthquakes.bgs.ac.uk/earthquakes/recent_events/20211116014340.html#page=summary

2021-03-31, M2.6 & M2.3, Rockall Trough

On the 31st of March 2021 at 02:47:08 UTC (03:47:08 local time), a magnitude M2.6 earthquake occurred in the Rockall Trough near the Hebrides Terrace Seamount, approximately 210 km north-northwest of Ireland. The epicentre location is indicated with a red circle in the map below, black lines denote major fault zones in and around Ireland. The earthquake occurred at a depth of 10 km, and was preceded by a magnitude M2.3 earthquake at the same location, occurring at 00:05:02 UTC (01:05:02 local time). Although earthquake detection rates in the Rockall Trough are lower than those of the Irish Sea, several events with magnitude M>2.0 have been detected in this region, most notably from 1980, when an earthquake of magnitude M4.0 occurred near the Hebrides Terrace Seamount.

The event was recorded by the stations of the Irish National Seismic Network (INSN) and can be seen in the waveforms plotted below:

2020-12-11, M0.6, Irish Sea

On the 11th of December 2020 at 04:13:26 GMT, a magnitude M0.6 earthquake occurred in the Irish Sea approximately 40 km from the Wicklow coast. The earthquake occurred at a depth of 1 km. The epicentre location is indicated with a red circle in the map below, black lines denote major fault zones in and around Ireland. Earthquakes regularly occur in the Irish Sea, the most recent of which was M1.3, occurring on the 17th of September 2020. The largest magnitude event recorded in the Irish Sea in recent times was the M2.5 earthquake, occurring on the 15th of December 2019.

The event was recorded by the stations of the Irish National Seismic Network (INSN) and the British Geological Survey, and can be seen in the waveforms plotted below:

2020-12-07, M0.6, Offshore Donegal

On the 7th December 2020 at 08:29:17 UTC a magnitude M0.6 earthquake occurred offshore Co. Donegal. The earthquake epicentre located approximately 12 km east of the island of Inistrahull, and 15 km northeast of the Inishowen peninsula. The earthquake occurred at a depth of 3 km. This is first time in which an event has been detected offshore northern Donegal, although several events have previously been detected offshore Antrim near Rathlin Island, and around the Scottish island of Islay. In the map below the epicentre of the earthquake is indicated with a red marker. Major fault zones in and around Ireland are shown with black lines.

The event was recorded by the Irish National Seismic Network (INSN) and can be seen in the waveforms plotted below:

2020-11-26, M2.5, Porcupine Abyssal Plain, North Atlantic

On the 26th of November 2020 at 04:29:59 UTC, a magnitude M2.5 earthquake occurred in the Porcupine Abyssal Plain, locating approximately 460km west-south-west off the coast of Kerry. The earthquake occurred at a depth of 10 km. The location of the epicentre is indicated with a red circle in the map below. While earthquakes are known to occur in this region, it is not often that they are detected. As almost all seismometers are land-based, only larger magnitude events (M > 2) are seen from this region. The previous two earthquakes from this area were detected in 2015 (M2.4 and M2.3), and the largest earthquake detected (since 1980) in the Porcupine region was M4.4, occurring on the 17th of February 1980.

The event was recorded by the Irish National Seismic Network (INSN) and can be seen in the waveforms plotted below:

2020-09-17, M1.3, Offshore Skerries, North Dublin

On the 17th of September 2020 at 17:31:40 GMT, a magnitude M1.3 earthquake occurred in the Irish Sea approximately 2 km offshore Skerries, North Dublin. The earthquake occurred at a depth of 14 km. The epicentre location is indicated with a red circle in the map below, black lines denote major fault zones in and around Ireland. Earthquakes do occur regularly in the Irish Sea, however, it is not often that earthquakes are detected so close to Ireland’s east coast. The last detected earthquake to occur within 10 km of the east coast was the M2.4 event from the 18th of March 2013, occurring 6 km offshore Wexford.

The event was recorded by the Irish National Seismic Network (INSN) and can be seen in the waveforms plotted below:

Past Seismograms
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Live Seismograms
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DSB - Dublin
VAL - Kerry

Past Spectrograms
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Live Spectrograms
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IWEX - Wexford
IDGL - Donegal